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INTRODUCTION

Imagine that your child is born with the most common birth defect. There are no concerns until he enters puberty and things begin to change.

At first he develops a dislike for activities that involve showing his body. You ask your physician about the 'warped chest' and learn that your child has a condition called Pectus Excavatum. The condition has "...no symptoms and correction is considered cosmetic".

In the following year your child begins to complain about feeling breathless with activity and his heart beating hard against his chest. You return to your physician with these complaints. As he examines your child, you note that the chest(always hidden) has undergone some alarming changes. The cavity is deeper and the chest wall appears to bulge on the left side. Your child is hunched over to hide it all.

Your physician thinks the breathing problems are not related to the Pectus Excavatum. Following your instincts, you insist on a referral to a specialist. It is granted, but you are forewarned not to expect recognition of either the physical or psychological symptoms of Pectus Excavatum.

Desperate for information, you go on line. You are relieved to find that you're not alone. Many others have gone through the same experience. Their sites provide invaluable information and support, that you will need for the long road ahead...

 
   
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